Tag Archives: CMA

Explore the Abstract Paintings of Ohio Artist Jack McWhorter in “Engraved Fields”

New Solo Exhibit at Canton Museum of Art Features Abstract Paintings from Local Artists

Engraved Fields features new work by Ohio artist, Jack McWhorter. These colorful, abstract paintings imbued with nature, color, and form are on view now through March 4, 2018. This original exhibition was curated by Tom Wachunas.

McWhorter develops his paintings through a thoughtful and intuitive process. He is inspired by the environment and has been known to paint in the woods surrounded by freshly fallen snow. Painting outdoors help MckWhorter bring his colors to life. This is recognizable in his work, as the pieces are striking and there is a light that emanates from within.


My paintings begin with the idea of stratification. On one level, they function as models of connectivity, arrivals, or snapshots of structures and relationships in flux, carrying the evidence of serpentine paths that led to their destination.” Said, Jack McWhorter. “The process is operational, where imagery grows through classical ideas of gesture and touch, and in the way paint is applied.”

Art enthusiasts may detect the influences of twentieth century painter Paul Cézanne (1839–1906). Considered part of the Post-Impressionist movement, his unique method of building form with color and his analytical approach to nature is similar to McWhorter’s methods.  


His abstract paintings challenge viewers to develop their own interpretations of the colors and patterns, which is one of the most interesting aspects of the exhibition.
Engraved Fields urges visitors to experience the work in person with an inquisitive and open mind. Viewers may observe closely and freely explore the artwork, allowing personal meanings and emotions to emerge through the abstract colors, forms, and surfaces.

“McWhorter refers to his constructed pictorial sites collectively as ‘engraved fields.’ The reference is an apt one in the sense that his paintings are fields of a kind, articulated with a painterly calligraphy describing poetic singularities.” Said, Tom Wachunas. “Looking at these exuberant paintings is to encounter places where the mysterious, the metaphorical, and the mundane are conflated into elegant coexistence. Welcome to the abstract sublime.”

Jack McWhorter received his Masters of Fine Arts from Kent State University in 1983. He has exhibited artwork in over 100 gallery and museum exhibitions throughout his career. Currently, McWhorter is an Associate Professor of Art at Kent State University Stark Campus.

About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6, Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.

New Folk Art Exhibit Features Historic Woodcarvings by Ohio Artist – Elijah Pierce

Canton Museum of Art Showcases Legendary African American Folk Artist

The new exhibition Elijah Pierce: An American Journey at the Canton Museum of Art (CMA) celebrates the artwork of one of the most important self-taught, American folk artists of the 20th century: Elijah Pierce (1892 – 1984). Pierce was a prolific African American wood carver known for his brightly painted sculptural panels illustrating biblical stories, moral lessons, historical events, and images from popular culture – a landscape of wood-carved art that is unlike any in America. This exhibit focuses on 39 major works. Featured in the exhibit is Pierce’s most ambitious carving, “Book of Wood” (1932), consisting of seven panels with 33 scenes illustrating the years Christ lived on the earth, as well as works depicting segregation, the Vietnam War, Watergate, and Civil Rights, among others. This exhibition is on view November 24, 2017 – March 4, 2018 with a free public reception on Thursday, December 7, 2017 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

About The Artist
Elijah Pierce (1892-1984) was a renowned master woodcarver, a humble barber, and a beloved lay minister. He was one of the great American traditional and self-taught artists and storytellers of the 20th century – amassing a body of wood-carved work acclaimed by museums and collections across the country. In a 1979 article from
The New York Times Magazine, Dr. Robert Bishop of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York noted, “There are 500 woodcarvers working today in the United States who are technically as proficient as Pierce, but none can equal the power of Pierce’s personal vision.” 

Pierce was born in a log cabin on the farm owned by his father, a former slave, in Baldwyn, Mississippi. It was a devout Baptist household, where Pierce and his eight siblings read the Bible daily with their parents. Pierce later stated, “
My mother and I used to read the Bible every evening after I got through with my chores.” This had a great influence upon his life and his carvings.

He began carving at an early age when his father gave him his first pocketknife. By age seven, Pierce was carving little wooden farm animals. His uncle, Lewis Wallace, instructed Pierce in the art of carving – teaching him how to work with wood, what kind of wood to use, and how to enjoy carving.


Pierce attended school through the eighth grade. In his early teens, he decided he didn’t want to be a farmer – it was “too long between paydays,” Pierce said. He had taken an interest in barbering and began learning the trade at local barbershops.


In 1915, he married his first wife, Zetta Palm, who died shortly afterwards. Two years later Pierce’s father passed away. Pierce then left Baldwyn, seeking opportunities in northern cities. He hopped rides on freight trains and even worked as an itinerant laborer for the railroad through Tennessee, Missouri, and Ohio. On a return trip home in 1920, Pierce was ordained and received his preacher’s license from his home church of Mt. Zion Baptist Church. Still unsettled in his life, he once again decided to head to the cities in the north. He made his home in Columbus, Ohio, where he married his second wife, Cornelia Houeston, in 1923. She was a devout Christian and had a strong influence on Pierce’s life. At first, he worked for another barber and then in 1951 opened his own shop on Long Street in the heart of the city’s African American community (his shop is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Long Street Gallery).


With his new wife and trade, Pierce lost interest in the nomadic lifestyle and rediscovered his love of woodcarving. Pierce’s early works were based on ideas from popular culture and consisted of small three-dimensional figures. By the early 1930s, he was carving panels in bas-relief and his subject matter was dominated with biblical scenes.


In 1932, Pierce completed the
Book of Wood, which he considered his best work. As a lay minister, a number of his later works were also inspired by biblical stories. His early work also depicted African-inspired fables, Freemasonry symbols, African American heroes, a veritable “Noah’s Ark” of animals, and his early life. His later carvings also reflected his interest in national politics, civil rights, as well as his love of baseball, boxing, and the movies.

It wasn’t until 1971, at the age of 79, that he was given his first solo exhibition at The Ohio State University art gallery. Within a few years Pierce became known both nationally and internationally in the world of folk art – participating in exhibitions at the National Museum of American Art, the Renwick Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art. In 1973, Pierce won first prize in the International Meeting of
Naïve Art in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. In 1982, his carvings were included in the monumental exhibition “Black Folk Art in America 1930 – 1980,” organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art. This exhibit was the turning point for contemporary black folk art. In that same year, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded him a National Heritage Fellowship as one of 15 master traditional artists. Two years later, Pierce died of a heart attack in Columbus. He was 92.

Elijah Pierce was one of the first African American wood carvers to receive significant recognition during his lifetime. Pierce was a master storyteller and his narrative carvings came to be regarded as important additions to American folk art.


The select carvings by Elijah Pierce in this exhibition fully represent his narrative carvings created between c. 1925-1975. Several of these carvings have not been widely exhibited because they were owned by fellow church members of Pierce in Columbus and were not known outside of his community until recent years.

About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6, Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.
  
Media Images: High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.

DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:
Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm


Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

Tom Bartel’s Unique Solo Exhibition is on View at the Canton Museum of Art

Experience Evocative Ceramic Works Inside Bartel’s “Dark Forms” Exhibit

Canton Museum of Art presents a unique exhibition of ceramic works entitled “Dark Forms: Tom Bartel.”  This solo exhibition is on view now through October 29, 2017.

Tom Bartel’s life has changed, and so has his work. He is at a re-defining moment after recently becoming a parent, which greatly opened his eyes to the passage of time. An artist hailing from Cleveland, Ohio, Tom Bartel is currently Professor of Ceramics at Ohio University, whose Ceramics Program ranks third in the United States. Previously, Bartel’s work was very colorful and patterned, as evidenced by one of his pieces that we proudly own in our Permanent Collection.  However, with his new exhibit – Dark Forms – he has set out to re-invent his work and push himself out of his comfort zone.  His pieces for this exhibit are devoid of color or pattern because he was aiming to reduce his ideas to the essential. The only carry-over from his previous works are his depictions of human forms. What do these pieces say about the passage of time, and how we as humans aim to “live on” through objects? Come see for yourself in Dark Forms: Tom Bartel.


About Tom Bartel
Tom Bartel grew up on the Erie shores of Cleveland, Ohio and is known for his disturbing and humorous fragmented figures that take cues from a “shotgun blast” of influences ranging from antiquity to popular culture. He received his BFA from Kent State University and his MFA from Indiana University-Bloomington. Tom has lectured, conducted workshops and exhibited extensively throughout the United States and internationally. His work is included in numerous public and private collections and he has received Individual Artist Fellowships from the Pennsylvania arts council, the Kentucky Arts Council and the Ohio Arts Council. He has numerous publications to his credit, including American Craft, Ceramics Monthly, Clay Times, Ceramics Art and Perception as well as many other periodicals and books. Bartel is currently an Associate Professor at Ohio University in Athens, Oh.

About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6, Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.
  
Media Images: High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.

DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:

Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm


Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

Unprecedented “Salon Style” Exhibition Features Over 200 Works at the Canton Museum of Art

“Salon Style” Exhibition is on view for a Limited Time Only
Experience the CMA permanent collection like never before in the new special Salon Styleexhibition on view now through October 29. “Salon style” is a way of displaying art in which works are hung higher and lower than eye level and in large groups rather than in a single row. Over 200 works of art are on display in this unprecedented exhibition featuring works by Carolyn Brady, George de Forest Brush, Frank Duveneck, William Gropper, Claude Raguet Hirst, Winslow Homer, Arne Lindmark, Joseph Soleman, and many more.

The style that inspired this exhibition, started in 1737 with the
Salon – a public art exhibit that was held annually or bi-annually in Paris. Any artist could exhibit their work if approved, and it was an honor for an artist to be chosen, especially a struggling artist because their work would gain notoriety in the Salon. Since there was an overwhelming amount of artwork to hang, works were hung floor to ceiling and close together. A Hanging Committee decided which paintings were to be displayed at what level. Placement was everything to an artist. Where their artwork was hung would determine who and how many people would see it – increasing or decreasing its chances of selling.

The
Salon was unique because it was open to anyone. Before the Salon, it was difficult for the public to see artwork because it was owned by private collectors. Since the Salonexhibitions were free, suddenly anyone could see the artwork regardless of their class, wealth, profession, or gender. Art was being observed by a whole new audience, an audience that wasn’t bound by etiquette or loyalty to the royal agenda. This new audience freely gave their opinions, and some artists began changing their work in response. Even the elite patrons of the arts were swayed by the public’s opinions. Art collectors began to purchase works only if they had received the public’s approval, and journalists and critics wanted to speak with the public who had approved the art. For almost 150 years, the Salonwas the most prestigious art event in the world.

Unlike the
Salon, today’s trend in museums is to exhibit works of art in single rows with plenty of space around each piece. While CMA almost always follows this trend, the salon style was brought back for this special exhibition. This wasn’t entirely an aesthetic choice – the skylights in the collection vault are being removed, so the paintings needed to be temporarily removed. Rather than store the paintings in the gallery and close it off to the public, the CMA curatorial staff decided to hang the works – all of them – for the public’s enjoyment. This exhibition doesn’t include every piece in the collection, but it provides a good foundation of the CMA collection as a whole. Don’t miss your chance to experience this European-inspired exhibition for a limited time only.


About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.
For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6, Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.
  
Media Images: High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.
 
DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:

Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm


Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

Top American Artists Tackle the History of Football in New Exhibit

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present is the first comprehensive assembly of work by prominent American artists focusing on football. This exciting new exhibition is on view August 1 – October 29, 2017 with a special public reception on August 10 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Scrimmage will allow audiences from around the country to discover and explore football and art in a community steeped in both. This special exhibition is organized by the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art (formerly the University Art Museum) at Colorado State University, and the Jorden Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

Through works assembled from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the Figge Art Museum, Denver Art Museum, The Rockwell Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts – Houston, Yale University, Canton Museum of Art, and numerous other public and private collections, including paintings, prints, sculptures, and new media, Scrimmage details the history of football from the end of the Civil War to the present, exploring themes such as race, teamwork, and competition for viewers to examine today. Scrimmagefeatures 60 works from American artists including: Winslow Homer,Holiday in Camp, 1865; R. Tait McKenzie, The Onslaught, 1920; Thomas Hart Benton, Forward Pass, 1972; Andy Warhol, O.J. Simpson, 1977; and Ernie Barnes, Fumble in the Line, 1990.

Scrimmage Programming:
Along with the exhibit, several collaborative events are planned to bring Scrimmage to life over three months throughout the Canton community:

– Pro Football Hall of Fame (August 1 – 6) will connect Hall of Fame players to audiences with panel discussions of health issues, race in sports, and the linkage of football and art. Dates and times of the presentations will be announced as they are made available.

– Arts In Stark ‘The Eleven’ Art Project (August 4) will unveil the newest mural, Super Bowl III, by artist Dirk Rozich with a free public reception at the Cultural Center for the Arts.

– AULTCARE Family Field Day (September 9) will be a free event to engage in outdoor arts and sports activities, and explore theScrimmage exhibit through tours led by local high school football coaches at the Canton Museum of Art. 11AM-3PM

– Canton Ballet (August – October) will perform variations ofTouchdowns and Tutus, a program featuring high school football players paired with dancers to illustrate how players use ballet as a training technique, at various community events.

– Canton Symphony Orchestra (September 3) will present a Summer in the Park “Tailgating” concert reliving football in music from film and television in advance of NFL season kickoff.

– Massillon Museum (August – October) continues an exhibit series with its Paul Brown collection, celebrating Brown as the first coach of the Cleveland Browns and a leader in racial integration of football.

– Canton Palace Theatre (September 7 – 8) will present Football Film Days featuring time-honored football favorites from the movies.

– Stark District Library (August– October) will be working with the Museum to present programs based on the book “Rudy: My Story,” which was chosen for the Library’s One Book, One Community feature.

Scrimmage Origins
This exhibition developed as curators discovered that a host of prominent American artists had pictured aspects of football and the public culture surrounding the sport, yet no focused art historical study had examined these images; in fact, very little research has addressed the large body of artworks that engage with sports.

The exhibition is not meant to present a history of football – the development of rules and gradual changes in play, the history of teams or players – but instead offers a window to understanding themes central to American life, both past and current. As such, the exhibition explores these images from multiple perspectives and themes. The Canton Museum of Art invites visitors to engage in a dialogue – with works of important American artists as a springboard – about sports, art, and their roles in our history and culture, and to reflect on how these images reveal attitudes and transitions in American life. The exhibition is divided into eight sections:

Football: the Spectator Sport 
How did football, which began as a private extracurricular activity for a small group of young men, become the public spectacle we know today?  Early on the sport was embraced by college administrators who saw benefits, including the potential for financial gain – contributions from alumni and institutional giving loyalty – and increased interest from the press. This exhibition examines the public culture of football as spectator sport. Football soon developed a culture separate from play on the field – bands, cheerleaders, mascots, team colors, pep-rallies, homecoming, and parades –  were all introduced early in the history of the sport. These remain vital parts of the culture and have led to modern-day fan-driven activities like tail-gating, team merchandising, and extensive half-time extravaganzas brought to super-size scale at the Super Bowl.  Artists, as fascinated by these phenomena as the game itself, picture these American obsessions.

Class, Race and Ethnicity
Initially isolated to the campuses of the Ivy Leagues, football began as a sport for upper-class white Americans. The exhibition examines issues of class, race, and ethnicity and football’s transition from an Ivy League sport to a mass-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-racial phenomenon. How did this transition happen? Early and frequent press coverage brought football to a mass audience, broadening interest in the sport; at the turn of the century American immigrants began to engage in casual games as a means of assimilation into American life; and, as the American education system democratized, welcoming a wider-spectrum of students to campuses across the country, college football rosters began to reflect a more diverse population.  Despite this, the imagery of football reflects ongoing racial and ethnic prejudice and biases.  While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery.

Football, Struggle, War and the “Strenuous Life”
President Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “strenuous life,” urging American men and boys to develop strength through athletics in preparation for “the rough work of the world.” In a 1900 article entitled “The American Boy” Roosevelt singled out football as a model. He admonished the American boy to engage in “manly exercises and to develop his body” and concluded by writing: “In short, in life, as in a foot-ball game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”  For Roosevelt, the “strenuous life” was also preparation for the necessity of war and keeping America strong.  This exhibit examines artists’ depictions that relate to the promotion of football as a model for masculinity and that suggest analogies to warfare.

Gender in Football: Women’s Roles
Despite Title IX legislation and attempts at developing women’s football leagues, women have not played a role on the gridiron. Yet women figure prominently in football imagery. The exhibition explores how images both perpetuate and challenge gender stereotypes. While Charles Dana Gibson’s The Coming Game: Yale vs. Vassar, 1895, places women as protagonists on the field, the majority of artists portray women in passive and objectified roles.  As adorned spectators, cheerleaders, drum majorettes, women serve as foils that clearly define play on the field as a masculine realm.

Football and Violence
Current discussions about long-term football injuries and the concussion crisis suggest that these concerns are new. Yet, as early as the colonial period, rudimentary forms of football were outlawed and condemned for their violent nature and for provoking incendiary behavior. And, in the early part of the 20th century, despite his love for football, Theodore Roosevelt bemoaned the lawless nature of the game. The troublesome nature of football, explored by artists from the 19th century through the contemporary period, emerged first in a score of illustrations.  In Scrimmage artists picture the extreme physical nature of the sport and its ramifications.

The American Sport
Yale Coach, Walter Camp (1859-1925), widely known as the “father of American football,” envisioned a game that mirrored a model of capitalism, industrial strength, and American ingenuity. Creating rules that clearly distinguished football from what he saw as its unruly English antecedents, Camp’s football imitated an American corporate structure with each player fulfilling a specific assignment, a hierarchy of positions, and managerial roles for quarterback and coaching staff.  In the exhibition, artwork reflects these ideas and other traditions specific to American ways of life, including the association of the Thanksgiving holiday with football, the quarterback as American hero, and the sport as a rite-of-passage.

Celebrity Culture and the Media
The rise of football as an American sport is directly tied to media coverage. In Scrimmage, a number of prints are displayed that were published and widely distributed through a popular press that brought the sport to wide attention. Michael Oriard’s books, Reading Football, and King Football, trace the arc of media coverage from these early prints, through the rise of radio, newsreels, and movies, to the advent of the televised game, chronicling how our mediated world has promoted the sport and its participants. The first televised game took place on December 28, 1958 and gradually, television coverage accentuated spectacle; the use of slow motion, instant replay, half-time interviews and locker room footage, turned the football contest into high drama, and heightened attention to the celebrity status of individual players. Television also transformed the way that football was seen – allowing fans to follow teams from the comfort of their own homes. In this section we examine artists reacting to celebrity culture and to mediated views of football.

Athleticism
The concept of “muscular Christianity” promoted in the late 19th and early 20th century suggested that vigorous exercise and participation in sports competition, developed positive moral characteristics. Popularized, in great part, because of fears that an urbanized workforce lacked physical fitness, the movement promoted strenuous activity.  Football was often a model.  Though not always aligned to the movement of “muscular Christianity” American leadership has repeatedly emphasized the need for physical fitness, athletic achievement, teamwork and sportsmanship.  Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy all stressed the need for improved physical condition; Eisenhower established the President’s Council on Youth Fitness in 1956 and Kennedy urged better physical fitness in light of Cold War competition with a fit Soviet populace.  Today, Michelle Obama promotes “Let’s Move” as a means towards a healthier, less sedentary life.  In this section we examine artists who celebrate the athletic prowess of athletes and the skill and beauty of athletics.

This special exhibition has been made possible with support in part by Stark Community Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, ArtsInStark, Aultcare, Visit Canton, and the Key Bank Foundation.

Media Images
High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.

DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:

http://bit.ly/2thuK68

About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6 Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.

Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm

Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

Beg/Int Pottery-Thursdays 12:30pm

April 13 – June 29
12 Thursdays, 12:30-2:30 pm
Instructor: Laura Kolinski-Schultz

Beginning students will be taught the basics of hand-building and wheel-work while intermediate students will refine their skills. Individual projects will include functional and decorative work. Glazing techniques will be taught, finished ware will be discussed, and demonstrations will be given.
* All CMA pottery students are required to purchase their clay from the CMA; the cost is $40.00 for 25 pounds of clay and includes cost of glazes and firing.
*Beginning students may purchase clay and a pottery tool kit ($13.50) from the CMA on the first day of class

Cost: $150 (Cost for Members: $120)

Beg/Int Pottery-Thursdays 10am

April 13 – June 29
12 Thursdays, 10:00-12:00 pm
Instructor: Laura Kolinski-Schultz

Beginning students will be taught the basics of hand-building and wheel-work while intermediate students will refine their skills. Individual projects will include functional and decorative work. Glazing techniques will be taught, finished ware will be discussed, and demonstrations will be given.
* All CMA pottery students are required to purchase their clay from the CMA; the cost is $40.00 for 25 pounds of clay and includes cost of glazes and firing.
*Beginning students may purchase clay and a pottery tool kit ($13.50) from the CMA on the first day of class

Cost: $150 (Cost for Members: $120)

Beg/Int Pottery – Wednesday 6:30PM

April 12 – June 28
12 Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
Instructor: Bill Shearrow

Beginning students will be taught the basics of hand-building and wheel-work while intermediate students will refine their skills. Individual projects will include functional and decorative work. Glazing techniques will be taught, finished ware will be discussed, and demonstrations will be given.
* All CMA pottery students are required to purchase their clay from the CMA; the cost is $40.00 for 25 pounds of clay and includes cost of glazes and firing.
*Beginning students may purchase clay and a pottery tool kit ($13.50) from the CMA on the first day of class
Cost: $150 (Cost for Members: $120)

Intermediate/Advanced Pottery

April 11 – June 27
12 Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
Instructor: Bill Shearrow

Students with a firm foundation in basic technical skills will enjoy this class. Form, surface design, glazing, and firing will be explored in greater depth. Advanced students (with five sessions or the equivalent, or working at a level determined to be advanced by the instructor) will be required to do their own firing in cooperation with the Ceramic Artists Guild in order to deepen their understanding of the total process.
* All CMA pottery students are required to purchase their clay from the CMA; the cost is $40.00 for 25 pounds of clay and includes cost of glazes and firing.
Cost: $150 (Cost for Members: $120)

“Art After Dark” Costume Party to Benefit MassMu and CMA

“Art After Dark” on Saturday, October 22, 8:00 p.m. to midnight, at the Massillon Museum will be an ultra-creative costume party—complete with a costume contest—but that will be just the beginning of the fun.

The Canton Museum of Art and MassMu have collaborated to create an event to remember. Everyone 18 and older is invited. Organizers have now announced the performers who will spark the theatrical Halloween atmosphere of the party.

Suzie Dills, a planetarian at the Hoover Price Planetarium in Canton, will lead the evening’s stargazing activities. The former executive director of the International Women’s Air and Space Museum at Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland, she has also presented many programs at the Lake Erie Nature and Science Center’s Walter R. Schuele Planetarium and is active throughout Northeast Ohio in astronomical societies.

Ed Ellis, who claims to have the world’s fastest hands, will mingle with guests performing his magic. For more than 25 years, Ellis has performed close-up comedy magic worldwide. He has played Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, he’s a regular in Hilton Head, he has toured South Korea Army bases, and he has frequently performed at national and international magic conventions. He earned Second Place in the Close-up International Battle of Magicians 2005 and came back to take First Place the following year.

The region’s Halloween king and Edgar Allan Poe expert, John Kiste, will present The Mask of the Red Death in the dramatic fashion for which he has become known. He performs regularly in Canal Fulton and has written plays and performed for the Museum’s One-Act Plays each spring as part of the NEA Big Read.

Seasoned readers Darcy Angle, Luna Hart, and Samantha Wolmotharot will offer tarot card readings for an additional fee throughout the party. Decks of 78 tarot cards have been used for games since the mid-15th century, but by the late 18th century, mystics were finding special meaning in the specific cards of the tarot deck and the order in which they appear. What will you learn about your future?

DJ Dave Ignizio of Square Records will keep dance music flowing from 8:00 p.m. to midnight. The Museum’s vintage photobooth will be ready to capture the unusual costumes of the evening. And several surprises will keep guests looking out of the corners of their eyes.

Come in costume—but don’t stay away if you prefer to party in street clothing and find amusement in the attire of other guests. To vie for special prizes, skew your costumes to fit the main categories: “Overall Best Costume” and “Best Art History Inspired Costume.”  Massillon Mayor Kathy Catazaro-Perry and Canton Mayor Tom Bernabei will judge the competition.

The $20 ticket includes entertainment, snacks, the dance party, and costume contest entry. Raffle tickets for unique baskets and Tarot card readings will be sold separately at the event. The cash bar will be open throughout the party. Each member of the Canton Museum of Art or Massillon Museum will receive one free drink ticket at the door. New members are welcome at any time. Proceeds from the party will benefit Massillon Museum exhibitions and programming and Canton Museum of Art exhibition programming.

Tickets may be purchased online now at massillonmuseum.org/party or in person at the Massillon Museum or the Canton Museum of Art. Tickets will be sold at the door if they remain available.

The Massillon Museum is located at 121 Lincoln Way East in downtown Massillon. Free parking is available on adjacent streets and in nearby city lots. For additional information, call the Massillon Museum at 330-833-4061, or visit massillonmuseum.org.