Category Archives: Canton

School of Canton Ballet Offers Fall Classes

 

School of Canton Ballet is now enrolling students for the fall semester.

Classes begin the week of September 6-12.  The school, in its 45th year of continuous operation, offers classes in all levels of classical ballet including creative movement, predance, elementary, intermediate and advanced as well as teen and adult.  Other offerings include jazz, modern and tap.

Students can register anytime as long as there is space available in the appropriate classes.  Pianists provide live music for all ballet classes.  Register online at cantonballet.com or call 330.455.7220.

Classes in the early childhood division include Mom & Me (parent or other adult), Predance, Creative Movement 1 and 2, Preballet and Elementary 1 and 2 taught by early childhood specialist Julie Mizer Grasse.

All students ages five and up are invited to perform in Canton Ballet’s The Nutcracker.

Faculty for Elementary Ballet 2 and 3 and advanced ballet levels include choreographer in residence Angelo Lemmo, assistant artistic director Jennifer Catazaro Hayward and artistic and executive director Cassandra Crowley.  Grasse and Lemmo also teach Teen and Adult.  Faculty for other dance forms are Kelli Sanford-Burgoon for modern and Megan Seeman for jazz and tap.

Financial assistance based upon need and merit is available through the School of Canton Ballet financial assistance program.  A special scholarship program is offered for boys ages 7 through 12.

School of Canton Ballet operates a year round program with classes taking place in the ballet studios in the west wing of the Cultural Center for the Arts at 1001 Market Avenue N. in downtown Canton.

For registration and other information call or visit the ballet offices at 330-455-7220 Monday through Thursday between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to noon or visit online at www.cantonballet.com.

ArtsinStark to Award $7,500 for Giant TV Image

ArtsinStark in Canton, OH invites any artist over 18 years of age living in the state of Ohio to submit an image to fit inside the giant television set being created for “Monday Night Football, 1970” — the sixth moment of The ELEVEN public art series.  ArtsinStark will award $5,000 to the winning artist, and $500 to each of five runners up.  All entries must be submitted by end of day September 18 at CAFÉ www.CallForEntry.org. Winners will be announced on October 2, 2017.  The area inside the TV screen is approximately 30’ high by 48’ wide.  Images submitted can be drawings, paintings, or digitally-created art.  The sponsors of “Monday Night Football” are: The Deuble Foundation, The Hoover Foundation, Stark Community Foundation, and The Timken Foundation.  For more information on The ELEVEN public art project, please go to www.ArtsinStark.com/84.

Canton, OH is the birthplace of the NFL.  The ELEVEN is a public art project of ArtsinStark and The Pro Football Hall of Fame celebrating the greatest moments in professional football history.  Five of the ELEVEN moments have been completed to date (three sculptures, one banner mural, and one painted mural).

“Monday Night Football” recognizes the phenomenal success of NFL games telecasted during prime time on a weeknight which began on September 21, 1970, when the Cleveland Browns faced the New York Jets on ABC-TV’s Monday Night Football debut.  Here is an excerpt from the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s 150 Anniversary Book: Sundays have long been synonymous with NFL football. But in 1970, a new weekly tradition that included one featured game on Monday night forever changed the landscape of the game. Few could imagine the enduring impact of ABC’s telecast of the NFL during prime time on a weeknight. Doubters were prevalent when the Cleveland Browns faced the New York Jets in the Monday Night Football debut on September 21, 1970. Yet the tradition became a nationwide phenomenon that captured huge ratings and in turn was a major reason for the NFL’s dramatic rise in popularity in the years that followed.

The judging criteria are: a) Does the design truly capture the moment?  b) Is the art of the highest possibility quality? and c) Is the concept so amazing that even visitors who don’t love football will still want to come see it?  Artists new to CAFÉ www.CallForEntry.org should reach out to Alaska Thompson, Project Coordinator at (330) 546-3098 or artbyalaska@gmail.com with questions.  Applying is a two-step process: 1) first you create a profile on CAFÉ https://youtu.be/2XOoFON-HMw , and 2) then you use your profile to apply for this specific call: Monday Night Football Design Competition ($7,500 in Prizes)

Dracula…the Ballet Returns to Haunt the Palace Stage

Canton Ballet will reprise its elegant and mesmerizing contemporary work Dracula…the Ballet in two evening performances on Friday, October 21, and Saturday, October 22, at the Canton Palace Theatre at 7:30 p.m.

Guest artist Damien Highfield of Groundworks Dance Theatre will perform the role of Dracula.  Canton Ballet’s artistic and executive director is Cassandra Crowley.

Choreographed in two acts by the ballet’s choreographer in residence Angelo Lemmo, Draculathe Ballet is based on novelist Bram Stoker’s classic gothic romance tale and stunningly retold in the medium of ballet.  Lemmo’s original music score is compiled from many genres—New Age, classical and choral, among others—with eerie sounds and special effects throughout.

Admission is $21-25 for adults and $15-17 for children under 18.  There is a discount for groups of 10 or more.  Reserved seat tickets may be purchased in advance online at www.cantonballet.com and in person or by telephone at 330-455-7220 at the ballet box office in the Canton Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Ave. N., between 9 am and 5 pm Monday through Thursday.

The beautifully restored historic Palace Theatre is located at 605 Market Ave. N. in the downtown Canton arts district.  There is a wheelchair seating area on the main floor.  The theatre box office opens one hour before performance time for advance purchase pickups and walkup sales only.

For additional information visit cantonballet.com or call the ballet office at 330-455-7220.  Canton Ballet receives operating funds from ArtsinStark, Ohio Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts with additional support from The Canton Repository, Kenan Advantage Group, Western Reserve Public Media, WHBC, WKSU, my 101.3 and Q92.

CSO Announces New Assistant Conductor

Canton Symphony Orchestra appoints

Matthew Jenkins Jaroszewicz as Assistant Conductor

http://artsinstarkblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/MJJ-Headshot-144x144.jpeg 144w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Matthew Jenkins Jaroszewicz has been named Assistant Conductor of the Canton Symphony Orchestra.  With this position, he becomes the Director of the Canton Youth Symphonies, and takes on the Canton Symphony Orchestra’s various educational concerts and pops series.

Matthew comes to the Canton Symphony Orchestra from New York City, NY, where he is conductor and Artistic Director of Apotheosis Opera.  Currently in its fourth season, Apotheosis Opera has scheduled Richard Strauss’ Capriccio for its summer opera experience.  Some of Matthew’s other conducting experiences in New York and New England include the Buffalo Philharmonic, Mannes Opera, and Wakefield Choral Society.  Other positions held by Matthew include accompanying The Charles River Chorale and Children’s Choir, and choir director and organist at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Holliston, MA.

Matthew earned his Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting from the Mannes College of Music in New York City, NY, and his Bachelor of Arts in Music from Brown University in Providence, RI.  His primary teachers include David Hayes, Vittorio Parisi, Johnathan Schiffman, and James Fellenbaum.

Under Mr. Jaroszewicz’s direction, the Canton Youth Symphonies will perform 3 concerts during the 2017-2018 season.  The Canton Youth Symphonies, now three orchestras strong, give young musicians of all ages the opportunity to rehearse and perform in a full orchestra.  Auditions for this year’s Canton Youth Symphonies will be held at the end of August, dates are still pending.    Students interested in auditioning should call Irene Barker, Director of Education and Community Engagement at 330-452-3434 ext. 604 to reserve an audition time.

Founded in 1937, the Canton Symphony Orchestra is a fully professional ensemble and organization dedicated to performing concerts that enrich, educate and entertain residents of Stark County and beyond. The orchestra performs classical, holiday, and a variety of educational programs in Umstattd Performing Arts Hall, 2323 17th Street NW, Canton, Ohio, as well as other venues in Stark County. For more information, please visit www.cantonsymphony.org or call (330)452-2094. Administrative offices are located at the Zimmermann Symphony Center, 2331 17th Street NW, Canton OH 44708.

Top American Artists Tackle the History of Football in New Exhibit

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present is the first comprehensive assembly of work by prominent American artists focusing on football. This exciting new exhibition is on view August 1 – October 29, 2017 with a special public reception on August 10 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Scrimmage will allow audiences from around the country to discover and explore football and art in a community steeped in both. This special exhibition is organized by the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art (formerly the University Art Museum) at Colorado State University, and the Jorden Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

Through works assembled from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the Figge Art Museum, Denver Art Museum, The Rockwell Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts – Houston, Yale University, Canton Museum of Art, and numerous other public and private collections, including paintings, prints, sculptures, and new media, Scrimmage details the history of football from the end of the Civil War to the present, exploring themes such as race, teamwork, and competition for viewers to examine today. Scrimmagefeatures 60 works from American artists including: Winslow Homer,Holiday in Camp, 1865; R. Tait McKenzie, The Onslaught, 1920; Thomas Hart Benton, Forward Pass, 1972; Andy Warhol, O.J. Simpson, 1977; and Ernie Barnes, Fumble in the Line, 1990.

Scrimmage Programming:
Along with the exhibit, several collaborative events are planned to bring Scrimmage to life over three months throughout the Canton community:

– Pro Football Hall of Fame (August 1 – 6) will connect Hall of Fame players to audiences with panel discussions of health issues, race in sports, and the linkage of football and art. Dates and times of the presentations will be announced as they are made available.

– Arts In Stark ‘The Eleven’ Art Project (August 4) will unveil the newest mural, Super Bowl III, by artist Dirk Rozich with a free public reception at the Cultural Center for the Arts.

– AULTCARE Family Field Day (September 9) will be a free event to engage in outdoor arts and sports activities, and explore theScrimmage exhibit through tours led by local high school football coaches at the Canton Museum of Art. 11AM-3PM

– Canton Ballet (August – October) will perform variations ofTouchdowns and Tutus, a program featuring high school football players paired with dancers to illustrate how players use ballet as a training technique, at various community events.

– Canton Symphony Orchestra (September 3) will present a Summer in the Park “Tailgating” concert reliving football in music from film and television in advance of NFL season kickoff.

– Massillon Museum (August – October) continues an exhibit series with its Paul Brown collection, celebrating Brown as the first coach of the Cleveland Browns and a leader in racial integration of football.

– Canton Palace Theatre (September 7 – 8) will present Football Film Days featuring time-honored football favorites from the movies.

– Stark District Library (August– October) will be working with the Museum to present programs based on the book “Rudy: My Story,” which was chosen for the Library’s One Book, One Community feature.

Scrimmage Origins
This exhibition developed as curators discovered that a host of prominent American artists had pictured aspects of football and the public culture surrounding the sport, yet no focused art historical study had examined these images; in fact, very little research has addressed the large body of artworks that engage with sports.

The exhibition is not meant to present a history of football – the development of rules and gradual changes in play, the history of teams or players – but instead offers a window to understanding themes central to American life, both past and current. As such, the exhibition explores these images from multiple perspectives and themes. The Canton Museum of Art invites visitors to engage in a dialogue – with works of important American artists as a springboard – about sports, art, and their roles in our history and culture, and to reflect on how these images reveal attitudes and transitions in American life. The exhibition is divided into eight sections:

Football: the Spectator Sport 
How did football, which began as a private extracurricular activity for a small group of young men, become the public spectacle we know today?  Early on the sport was embraced by college administrators who saw benefits, including the potential for financial gain – contributions from alumni and institutional giving loyalty – and increased interest from the press. This exhibition examines the public culture of football as spectator sport. Football soon developed a culture separate from play on the field – bands, cheerleaders, mascots, team colors, pep-rallies, homecoming, and parades –  were all introduced early in the history of the sport. These remain vital parts of the culture and have led to modern-day fan-driven activities like tail-gating, team merchandising, and extensive half-time extravaganzas brought to super-size scale at the Super Bowl.  Artists, as fascinated by these phenomena as the game itself, picture these American obsessions.

Class, Race and Ethnicity
Initially isolated to the campuses of the Ivy Leagues, football began as a sport for upper-class white Americans. The exhibition examines issues of class, race, and ethnicity and football’s transition from an Ivy League sport to a mass-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-racial phenomenon. How did this transition happen? Early and frequent press coverage brought football to a mass audience, broadening interest in the sport; at the turn of the century American immigrants began to engage in casual games as a means of assimilation into American life; and, as the American education system democratized, welcoming a wider-spectrum of students to campuses across the country, college football rosters began to reflect a more diverse population.  Despite this, the imagery of football reflects ongoing racial and ethnic prejudice and biases.  While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery.

Football, Struggle, War and the “Strenuous Life”
President Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “strenuous life,” urging American men and boys to develop strength through athletics in preparation for “the rough work of the world.” In a 1900 article entitled “The American Boy” Roosevelt singled out football as a model. He admonished the American boy to engage in “manly exercises and to develop his body” and concluded by writing: “In short, in life, as in a foot-ball game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”  For Roosevelt, the “strenuous life” was also preparation for the necessity of war and keeping America strong.  This exhibit examines artists’ depictions that relate to the promotion of football as a model for masculinity and that suggest analogies to warfare.

Gender in Football: Women’s Roles
Despite Title IX legislation and attempts at developing women’s football leagues, women have not played a role on the gridiron. Yet women figure prominently in football imagery. The exhibition explores how images both perpetuate and challenge gender stereotypes. While Charles Dana Gibson’s The Coming Game: Yale vs. Vassar, 1895, places women as protagonists on the field, the majority of artists portray women in passive and objectified roles.  As adorned spectators, cheerleaders, drum majorettes, women serve as foils that clearly define play on the field as a masculine realm.

Football and Violence
Current discussions about long-term football injuries and the concussion crisis suggest that these concerns are new. Yet, as early as the colonial period, rudimentary forms of football were outlawed and condemned for their violent nature and for provoking incendiary behavior. And, in the early part of the 20th century, despite his love for football, Theodore Roosevelt bemoaned the lawless nature of the game. The troublesome nature of football, explored by artists from the 19th century through the contemporary period, emerged first in a score of illustrations.  In Scrimmage artists picture the extreme physical nature of the sport and its ramifications.

The American Sport
Yale Coach, Walter Camp (1859-1925), widely known as the “father of American football,” envisioned a game that mirrored a model of capitalism, industrial strength, and American ingenuity. Creating rules that clearly distinguished football from what he saw as its unruly English antecedents, Camp’s football imitated an American corporate structure with each player fulfilling a specific assignment, a hierarchy of positions, and managerial roles for quarterback and coaching staff.  In the exhibition, artwork reflects these ideas and other traditions specific to American ways of life, including the association of the Thanksgiving holiday with football, the quarterback as American hero, and the sport as a rite-of-passage.

Celebrity Culture and the Media
The rise of football as an American sport is directly tied to media coverage. In Scrimmage, a number of prints are displayed that were published and widely distributed through a popular press that brought the sport to wide attention. Michael Oriard’s books, Reading Football, and King Football, trace the arc of media coverage from these early prints, through the rise of radio, newsreels, and movies, to the advent of the televised game, chronicling how our mediated world has promoted the sport and its participants. The first televised game took place on December 28, 1958 and gradually, television coverage accentuated spectacle; the use of slow motion, instant replay, half-time interviews and locker room footage, turned the football contest into high drama, and heightened attention to the celebrity status of individual players. Television also transformed the way that football was seen – allowing fans to follow teams from the comfort of their own homes. In this section we examine artists reacting to celebrity culture and to mediated views of football.

Athleticism
The concept of “muscular Christianity” promoted in the late 19th and early 20th century suggested that vigorous exercise and participation in sports competition, developed positive moral characteristics. Popularized, in great part, because of fears that an urbanized workforce lacked physical fitness, the movement promoted strenuous activity.  Football was often a model.  Though not always aligned to the movement of “muscular Christianity” American leadership has repeatedly emphasized the need for physical fitness, athletic achievement, teamwork and sportsmanship.  Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy all stressed the need for improved physical condition; Eisenhower established the President’s Council on Youth Fitness in 1956 and Kennedy urged better physical fitness in light of Cold War competition with a fit Soviet populace.  Today, Michelle Obama promotes “Let’s Move” as a means towards a healthier, less sedentary life.  In this section we examine artists who celebrate the athletic prowess of athletes and the skill and beauty of athletics.

This special exhibition has been made possible with support in part by Stark Community Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, ArtsInStark, Aultcare, Visit Canton, and the Key Bank Foundation.

Media Images
High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.

DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:

http://bit.ly/2thuK68

About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6 Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.

Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm

Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

North Canton Playhouse Presents Disney’s Beauty and the Beast

The North Canton Playhouse presents Disney’s Beauty and the Beast” Musical

 

Directed by Debbie Cardy

Music by Alan Menken

Lyrics by Howard Ashman Tim Rice

Book by Linda Woolverton

Originally Directed by Robert Jess Roth

Originally Produced by Disney Theatrical Productions

Beauty and the Beast is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International 

 

Performance Dates: July 27 – August 13, 2017

Where: North Canton Playhouse Main Stage ( 525 7th St. N.E., North Canton)

Tickets:  General Admission $15

Story Time with Belle: Child Ticket $10, Accompanying Adult free

Tea Time with Mrs. Potts: Child Ticket $15, Adult Ticket $10

Performance dates, times, details and tickets can be found at www.northcantonplayhouse.com by clicking “Beauty and the Beast tickets”.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.northcantonplayhouse.com or by calling 330-494-1613 Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 9am-2pm.

 

Synopsis:

The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed into his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity.

 

Story Time with Belle:

Come and listen to a story told by your favorite princess, Belle, with the help from some of her friends. There will be a special copy of the Little Golden Book of the original “Beauty and the Beast” story signed by the entire cast given out to all the children along with a treat. The event will cost $10 per child (accompanying parents are at no additional charge but they must make a reservation). Reservations are in addition to the price of the show ticket.

 

Tea Time with Mrs. Potts:

Come and dine in our French provincial town and meet the characters from Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. They will be coming around to the tables to visit and you will be able to get their autograph in a special coloring/autograph book designed just for this occasion. This will be a special “reservation only” lunch that will include a light meal (sandwiches, fruit and cookies) and all the tea you would like. Mrs. Potts will be sharing a few thoughts with the children as well as a story where the enchanted objects solve a  mystery along with the help of the audience. The parent meal does not include the autograph/coloring book and other extra items for the children. Reservations are in addition to the price of the show ticket.

Saturdays in the City Begin May 20! SHOP! EAT! PLAY!

The Canton Arts District, ArtsinStark, and the Downtown Canton Flea have joined forces to bring the community a fun day of shopping, food, and family activities as they kick off Saturdays in the City.

SHOP! This year, the hugely popular Downtown Canton Flea moves west to the center of the Canton Arts District. With over 50 artisan vendors selling jewelry, wood carvings, vintage items, art, and more, it’s sure to be a buyer’s paradise. Plus visit all the brick and mortar business of the Arts District like Avenue Arts, Apothecary, Cantonology, Lynda Tuttle’s, Arrowhead Vintage, Print and Press, IKON,  Colette’s Vintage, and Collective Skate.

EAT! Get your morning coffee fix with a stop at Carpe Diem. Need to grab a bite? Street food vendors will be on hand plus lots of your downtown favorites will be open ready to serve like Cultured Coffee and Waffles, Arcadia Grille, Deli Ohio, Canton Brewing Co, and George’s. Plus, Royal Docks will be on hand with cold brews!

PLAY! Bring the kids and enjoy the kids area with a bounce house, make and take activity, and yard games at Market Square. Enjoy live music around the district from Pat Masalko, Andy Cyphert, and more. Finish your day with a visit to the Canton Museum of Art’s newest exhibit, Avatars.

SHOP! EAT! PLAY! It all happens Saturday, May 20 from 10am-2pm at 4th Street NW and Court Ave. A great day to enjoy the sunshine in the Canton Arts District!

The Symphony League of Canton Presents Denim & Diamonds

The Symphony League of Canton invites you to DON YOUR DENIM- GRAB YOUR BOOTS & FLAUNT YOUR BLING for DENIM & Diamonds – In Place 2017 on June 11 @ 6:00 pm at the home of Bob & Linda DeHoff, 7700 Mudbrook Road NW.

League president Cindy Samolczyk explains, “Each year we raise money to support the Canton Symphony’s Education and Outreach Programs by having a couple hundred friends over for dinner! It’s a great way to celebrate local culinary talent and showcase beautiful homes in our community. This year’s DENIM & Diamonds theme combines a little bit of country with a little bit of chic to create a perfect summer outing.”

In Place culinary participants include: AA Executive Catering, Bender’s Tavern, Bravo Cucina Italiana, Canal Tavern, Carpe Diem, Chocolates by Erin, Chop House, Fisher’s Catering Company, Gabe’s Meats and Deli, Gervasi Vineyard, Gregory’s Restaurant, Lucca. Mulligan’s Restaurant & Pub, Palombo’s Italian Restaurant, Sassy Delight Confections, Shy Cellars, The Twisted Olive, The West Side Bakery. Entertainment will be provided The Stockdale Family Band. Event sponsors include: Canton Chair Rental, Cathy Cowgill Flowers & Rohr Nursery.

Reservation deadline is June 2, 2017 and tickets are $125 each or $150 per person for a patron ticket. Tickets include unlimited tastings and an open bar. Information and tickets are available by calling the Canton Symphony Orchestra box office at 330.452.2094 or online at www.cantonsymphony.org/Inplace2017

Founded in 1963, the Symphony League of Canton maintains and furthers the Canton Symphony Orchestra’s tradition of excellence by promoting the orchestra in the community, developing financial and volunteer staff support for the Orchestra Association and by providing educational outreach to the community and educational enrichment for the membership.  The Canton Symphony Orchestra offices are located at the Zimmermann Symphony Center, 2331 17th St NW Canton, Ohio, 44708.

Jim Brickman Joins the Canton Symphony Orchestra

Cleveland native Jim Brickman is a worldwide sensation with his soulful piano playing.  His simplistic song style has won the hearts of many, and has kept his music on the top of the charts across the country and the world.  In May, he will be coming back to Canton to join the CSO for one special night for their Benefit Concert.  The concert begins with the generosity of the CSO musicians, who are donating their services for the rehearsal and performance.  Concert proceeds will support the Canton Symphony Orchestra Endowment – ensuring the future of Stark County’s flagship arts organization.

Jim Brickman is an American songwriter and pianist of pop, as well as a radio show host. Brickman has earned six Gold and Platinum albums. He is known for his solo piano compositions, pop-style instrumentals, and vocal collaborations with artists such as Lady Antebellum, Johnny Mathis, Michael W. Smith, Martina McBride, Megan Hilty, Donny Osmond, Delta Goodrem, Olivia Newton-John, and many others.  He has earned two Grammy nominations for his albums Peace (2003) for Best Instrumental, and Faith (2009) for Best New Age Album; an SESAC “Songwriter of the Year” award; a Canadian Country Music Award for Best Vocal/Instrumental Collaboration; and a Dove Award presented by the Gospel Music Association.

Along with regular concert tickets, the CSO is also selling tickets for a special VIP event after the concert.  This post-concert party will have complimentary hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, and a meet & greet with Mr. Brickman.  The party is being held in Foundation Hall, which is connected to the Zimmermann Symphony Center.  Tickets for the VIP event are on sale now through the box office and online, and are $25 each.

Tickets for the Canton Symphony Orchestra concert on May 13, 2017 range in price from $20-$60 and are available online at www.cantonsymphony.org, by phone at 330-452-2094 or in person at the Canton Symphony Orchestra administrative offices in the Zimmermann Symphony Center at 2331 17th Street NW in Canton weekdays 9am-5pm.

Founded in 1937, the Canton Symphony Orchestra is a fully professional ensemble and organization dedicated to performing concerts that enrich, educate and entertain residents of Stark County and beyond. The orchestra performs classical, holiday, and a variety of educational programs in Umstattd Performing Arts Hall, 2323 17th Street NW, Canton, Ohio, as well as other venues in Stark County. For more information, please visit www.cantonsymphony.org or call (330)452-2094. Administrative offices are located at the Zimmermann Symphony Center 2331 17th Street NW, Canton OH 44708.

75th Annual May Show Awards Notification

The Little Art Gallery of the North Canton Public Library will host a private opening reception for the 75th Annual May Show Sunday, April 30, 2017. Awards in each category as well as best in show will be presented as follows.

Best In Show

Artist: Erin T. Mulligan

Title: The Feeding

Media: Graphite and Oil on Clayboard

 

Oil 

First Place

Artist: Bruce Humbert

Title: The Garden Gate

Media: Oil on Clayboard

Second Place

Artist: Frank Dale

Title: The Eye of the Beholder

Media: Oil on Panel

 

Watercolor

First Place

Artist: Nancy Young Darrah

Title: View of Vernazza

Media: Watercolor

Second Place 

Artist: Ted Lawson

Title: 30 ROCK III

Media: Watercolor

 

Acrylic

First Place               

Artist: Karen Hemsley

Title: Shell Game

Media: Acrylic on Canvas

Second Place         

Artist: Tina Myers

Title: Grief

Media: Acrylic  on Wood

 

Drawings & Original Prints  

First Place               

Artist: Lee Ann Novotny

Title: A Place to Hang Her Hat

Media: Colored Pencil on Paper

Second Place          

Artist: Diane Belfiglio

Title: Going Deeper II

Media: Oil Pastel on Pencil

Honorable Mention  

Artist: Rosemary Hayne

Title: Old Blue

Media: Colored Pencil on Black Gesso

Mixed Media

First Place               

Artist: Karen S. Bogdan

Title: Deep in the Forest

Media: Fabric/Thread

Second Place         

Artist: Wanda L. Montgomery

Title: Shopping Day

Media: Acrylic/Handmade Paper/Collage

Three-Dimensional

First Place               

Artist: Robert Bratton

Title: Reliquary: ST. Dymphna’s Rib

Media: Wood/Bone/Plaster

Second Place         

Artist: Tom Migge

Title: Vase #L-105

Media: Sculpted Walnut and Oak

The Little Art Gallery invited artists to submit entries in five categories for the gallery’s annual juried show. In total, 130 pieces were submitted by 65 Stark County artists.. The show was juried by Meghan Olis and Rachel Davis.

The May Show is designed to recognize the talents and achievements of local artists. In exhibiting such works, the Little Art Gallery strives to promote awareness of the arts and to make fine art accessible to North Canton and surrounding communities.

The show invited entries from any artist 16 years of age or older, living in Stark County. All works submitted were required to be original, recent (within the past three years) and not previously exhibited in a Little Art Gallery show. All media, with the exception of photography and digital images (unless altered as mixed media fine art), were accepted for consideration.

The May Show will be on exhibit in the North Canton Public Library’s Little Art Gallery from May 1-31, 2017.

Juror Information:

Meghan Olis

Meghan Olis graduated from Case Western Reserve University with an M.A. in Art History and Museum Studies in 2005. Originally from Alabama, she received her BA in Anthropology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her career in the arts began in 2005 when she worked for Cleveland artist and industrial designer, Viktor Schreckengost, organizing exhibitions and events in celebration of his 100th birthday. In the years since, she managed both the move and re-installation of the Akron Art Museum’s collection into their newly renovated museum space (2006-2007) and taught Art History at Kent State University (2009-2011). Meghan is currently an exhibition specialist at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Cleveland, Ohio, where she has worked since 2007.

Juror Statement: It was an honor to judge these works made by Stark County artists. Jurying is not an easy task because art can be so subjective. When looking closely at each piece, I focused primarily on the artist’s use of medium, technical skill, creativity, and overall composition. I do not allow the subject matter to sway me, otherwise I would end up with a show of cute animals and not one that represents the skill level and hard work of the artists. Thank you to the Little Art Gallery for this opportunity and for your commitment to local art.

 

Rachel Davis:

Rachel Davis has owned and operated Rachel Davis Fine Arts Auctioneers and Appraisers since 1987. Her gallery specializes in the sale of American and European 19th and 20th century paintings, prints and sculpture. Some of the highlights her gallery has sold are the Baldwin Wallace University art collection and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company art collection. She has been a juror for several shows over the past 20 years in northern Ohio, the most recent being Cleveland Creates 2017-ArtNEO-Cleveland, OH.  She has been a co-curator for the following shows held at the Canton Museum of Art: Avatars-Relics From the Future-The Art of Gary Spinosa- April – July 2017; Three Voices-Conversations on Life & Conflict-September 1 – October 30, 2016 and The Cleveland School-Watercolor and Clay-December 1, 2012 – March 10, 2013.  Rachel has given several presentations regarding assessing art including Less than Perfect: How to Assess Condition Issues When Valuing Works On Paper-International Society of Appraisers Annual Conference, Dallas TX  2016 and Beyond the Obvious: Re-defining ‘Regional’ from Local to Global-Guest panelist, American Society of Appraisers, New York, NY, November 8, 2014. Rachel received degrees in Art History and Chemistry with a minor in painting from the University of Delaware and a MBA from Indiana University, Bloomington.

Juror Statement: First, I want to thank Elizabeth for asking me to be a juror; it is an honor and something that I find very enjoyable. When I approach a body of work, I like to first walk through and see which pieces catch my eye. This is one of the most important criteria for me:  Am I drawn into the work? Does it hold my eye? Next step is to understand why. First, does it convey an original idea, thought or emotion that goes beyond the handling of the materials? Does the artist convey a sense of feeling and care about his/her work? How well does his/her composition and design translate. Secondly, I view the technical skill and how well the artist has mastered his/her chosen medium with its inherent limitations and strength. The medium should not be an end to itself, but does the artist take this medium into new directions and test its limits? Lastly, I like to present a show that shows diversity in both ideas and techniques. It is hard to eliminate works and some fine works were rejected because I felt they failed in one of the above aspects. It is nice to see such a thriving art community and the large number of entrants speaks volumes of how highly regarded this annual show is.

 

For additional information, please contact Elizabeth Blakemore at 330.499.4712 or gallery@northcantonlibrary.org.