Category Archives: Canton

NFL Films Coming to Canton for “Touchdowns and Tutus” http://artsinstarkblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Griffin20Baumoel20and20Isabella20Hellmann20perform20at20201720Touchdowns20and20Tutus-300×285.jpg

Touchdowns and Tutus — the event that pairs area high school football players with Canton Ballet ballerinas was such a hit its first year — that NFL films is coming to cover it this year.  To start, Producer/Director Greg Frith will bring his film crew to the 5 pm auditions for football players to be held on Sunday October 8 at the Cultural Center for the Arts (1001 Market Avenue North).   The Emmy Award winning Frith has produced a variety of NFL Films including, A Football Life on Dick Vermeil, 1995 Cleveland Browns, 2006 Rose Bowl, and the Massillon/McKinley Rivalry.  Then next spring Frith and his team will return for the big performance on March 10, 2018 at Umstattd Performing Arts Hall on the Pro Football Hall of Fame campus.

The “tryouts” are open to all area high school football players.  Participants are encouraged to come dressed in workout attire, including sneakers.  Players chosen will start rehearsals beginning in January 2018 and will practice weekly.  Each couple will rehearse a different routine to be performed and judged at the event.  To reserve a spot for tryouts, please call Canton Ballet at 330-455-7220.  For all other event related information, please contact chairperson Ashley Bettis at 330.324.0073.

Touchdowns and Tutus is the biggest fundraiser supporting the Canton Ballet. The Canton Ballet has been serving the Stark County community for 52 years.  Students from 2 years to adult participate in the School of Canton Ballet’s year round program and its various public performances.

Pictured: are  Griffin Baumoel — linebacker for the Canton Central Catholic “Crusaders” (at US Naval Academy now) and Isabella Hellmann — Junior at Hoover High School (a 10-year Canton Ballet student.)

 

TOUCHDOWNS AND TUTUS TO HOLD FOOTBALL PLAYER PARTICIPATION AUDITION

Canton Ballet will hold Touchdowns and Tutus football player participation auditions on Sunday, October 8, 2017, at the Canton Ballet studios located in the west wing of the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue N, Canton, OH starting at 5PM.  Use the Cleveland Avenue entrance.

The “tryouts” are open to all area high school football players.  Participants are encouraged to come dressed in workout attire, including sneakers.

Launched in 2017, Touchdowns and Tutus proved to be very well received by the participants as well as the sponsors and general public.  So much so that this year Greg Frith, an Emmy Award winning Producer/Director for NFL Films, will be on site at Canton Ballet to film the tryouts and event performance.

Frith has produced and directed a variety of NFL Films including, A Football Life on Dick Vermeil, 1995 Cleveland Browns, 2006 Rose Bowl and the Massillon/McKinley Rivalry.

Players chosen will start rehearsals beginning in January 2018 and will practice weekly leading up to the event on March 10, 2018, at Umstattd Performing Arts Hall located in McKinley High School on the Pro Football Hall of Fame campus.  All student athletes under the age of 18 will be required to have a parent-signed release waiver prior to the tryout.

Touchdowns and Tutus is the biggest fundraiser supporting the Canton Ballet.  The event pairs area high school football players with Canton Ballet ballerinas.  Each couple rehearses a different routine to be performed and judged at the event.

To reserve a spot for tryouts, please call Canton Ballet at 330-455-7220 Monday throughThursday, 10AM-6PM.  Release waivers are available by emailing: cantonballet@cantonballet.com and requesting one.  For all other event related information, including sponsorship opportunities, please contact chairperson Ashley Bettis at 330.324.0073.

About Canton Ballet: Canton Ballet has been serving the Stark county community for 52 years.  Students from 2 years to adult participate in the School of Canton Ballet’s year round program and its various public performances.  Mission statement: Canton Ballet is a non-profit organization committed to fostering an appreciation of the art of dance within the local community and dedicated to providing the highest artistic quality of instruction by operating a preprofessional company with performance opportunities for the serious or career oriented student.

Unprecedented “Salon Style” Exhibition Features Over 200 Works at the Canton Museum of Art

“Salon Style” Exhibition is on view for a Limited Time Only
Experience the CMA permanent collection like never before in the new special Salon Styleexhibition on view now through October 29. “Salon style” is a way of displaying art in which works are hung higher and lower than eye level and in large groups rather than in a single row. Over 200 works of art are on display in this unprecedented exhibition featuring works by Carolyn Brady, George de Forest Brush, Frank Duveneck, William Gropper, Claude Raguet Hirst, Winslow Homer, Arne Lindmark, Joseph Soleman, and many more.

The style that inspired this exhibition, started in 1737 with the
Salon – a public art exhibit that was held annually or bi-annually in Paris. Any artist could exhibit their work if approved, and it was an honor for an artist to be chosen, especially a struggling artist because their work would gain notoriety in the Salon. Since there was an overwhelming amount of artwork to hang, works were hung floor to ceiling and close together. A Hanging Committee decided which paintings were to be displayed at what level. Placement was everything to an artist. Where their artwork was hung would determine who and how many people would see it – increasing or decreasing its chances of selling.

The
Salon was unique because it was open to anyone. Before the Salon, it was difficult for the public to see artwork because it was owned by private collectors. Since the Salonexhibitions were free, suddenly anyone could see the artwork regardless of their class, wealth, profession, or gender. Art was being observed by a whole new audience, an audience that wasn’t bound by etiquette or loyalty to the royal agenda. This new audience freely gave their opinions, and some artists began changing their work in response. Even the elite patrons of the arts were swayed by the public’s opinions. Art collectors began to purchase works only if they had received the public’s approval, and journalists and critics wanted to speak with the public who had approved the art. For almost 150 years, the Salonwas the most prestigious art event in the world.

Unlike the
Salon, today’s trend in museums is to exhibit works of art in single rows with plenty of space around each piece. While CMA almost always follows this trend, the salon style was brought back for this special exhibition. This wasn’t entirely an aesthetic choice – the skylights in the collection vault are being removed, so the paintings needed to be temporarily removed. Rather than store the paintings in the gallery and close it off to the public, the CMA curatorial staff decided to hang the works – all of them – for the public’s enjoyment. This exhibition doesn’t include every piece in the collection, but it provides a good foundation of the CMA collection as a whole. Don’t miss your chance to experience this European-inspired exhibition for a limited time only.


About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.
For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6, Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.
  
Media Images: High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.
 
DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:

Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm


Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

Dracula…the Ballet Returns to Haunt the Palace Stage

Canton Ballet will reprise its elegant and mesmerizing contemporary work Dracula…the Ballet in two evening performances on Friday, October 21, and Saturday, October 22, at the Canton Palace Theatre at 7:30 p.m.

Choreographed in two acts by the ballet’s choreographer in residence Angelo Lemmo, Draculathe Ballet is based on novelist Bram Stoker’s classic gothic romance tale and stunningly retold in the medium of ballet.  Lemmo’s original music score is compiled from many genres—New Age, classical and choral, among others—with eerie sounds and special effects throughout.

Guest artist Damien Highfield of Groundworks Dance Theatre will perform the role of Dracula.  Canton Ballet’s artistic and executive director is Cassandra Crowley.

Admission is $21-25 for adults and $15-17 for children under 18.  There is a discount for groups of 10 or more.  Reserved seat tickets may be purchased in advance online at www.cantonballet.com and in person or by telephone at 330-455-7220 at the ballet box office in the Canton Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Ave. N., between 9 am and 5 pm Monday through Thursday.

The beautifully restored historic Palace Theatre is located at 605 Market Ave. N. in the downtown Canton arts district.  There is a wheelchair seating area on the main floor.  The theatre box office opens one hour before performance time for advance purchase pickups and walkup sales only.

For additional information visit cantonballet.com or call the ballet office at 330-455-7220.

Canton Ballet receives operating funds from ArtsinStark, Ohio Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts with additional support from The Canton Repository, Kenan Advantage Group, Western Reserve Public Media, WHBC, WKSU, My 101.3 and Q92.

School of Canton Ballet Offers Fall Classes

 

School of Canton Ballet is now enrolling students for the fall semester.

Classes begin the week of September 6-12.  The school, in its 45th year of continuous operation, offers classes in all levels of classical ballet including creative movement, predance, elementary, intermediate and advanced as well as teen and adult.  Other offerings include jazz, modern and tap.

Students can register anytime as long as there is space available in the appropriate classes.  Pianists provide live music for all ballet classes.  Register online at cantonballet.com or call 330.455.7220.

Classes in the early childhood division include Mom & Me (parent or other adult), Predance, Creative Movement 1 and 2, Preballet and Elementary 1 and 2 taught by early childhood specialist Julie Mizer Grasse.

All students ages five and up are invited to perform in Canton Ballet’s The Nutcracker.

Faculty for Elementary Ballet 2 and 3 and advanced ballet levels include choreographer in residence Angelo Lemmo, assistant artistic director Jennifer Catazaro Hayward and artistic and executive director Cassandra Crowley.  Grasse and Lemmo also teach Teen and Adult.  Faculty for other dance forms are Kelli Sanford-Burgoon for modern and Megan Seeman for jazz and tap.

Financial assistance based upon need and merit is available through the School of Canton Ballet financial assistance program.  A special scholarship program is offered for boys ages 7 through 12.

School of Canton Ballet operates a year round program with classes taking place in the ballet studios in the west wing of the Cultural Center for the Arts at 1001 Market Avenue N. in downtown Canton.

For registration and other information call or visit the ballet offices at 330-455-7220 Monday through Thursday between 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to noon or visit online at www.cantonballet.com.

ArtsinStark to Award $7,500 for Giant TV Image

ArtsinStark in Canton, OH invites any artist over 18 years of age living in the state of Ohio to submit an image to fit inside the giant television set being created for “Monday Night Football, 1970” — the sixth moment of The ELEVEN public art series.  ArtsinStark will award $5,000 to the winning artist, and $500 to each of five runners up.  All entries must be submitted by end of day September 18 at CAFÉ www.CallForEntry.org. Winners will be announced on October 2, 2017.  The area inside the TV screen is approximately 30’ high by 48’ wide.  Images submitted can be drawings, paintings, or digitally-created art.  The sponsors of “Monday Night Football” are: The Deuble Foundation, The Hoover Foundation, Stark Community Foundation, and The Timken Foundation.  For more information on The ELEVEN public art project, please go to www.ArtsinStark.com/84.

Canton, OH is the birthplace of the NFL.  The ELEVEN is a public art project of ArtsinStark and The Pro Football Hall of Fame celebrating the greatest moments in professional football history.  Five of the ELEVEN moments have been completed to date (three sculptures, one banner mural, and one painted mural).

“Monday Night Football” recognizes the phenomenal success of NFL games telecasted during prime time on a weeknight which began on September 21, 1970, when the Cleveland Browns faced the New York Jets on ABC-TV’s Monday Night Football debut.  Here is an excerpt from the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s 150 Anniversary Book: Sundays have long been synonymous with NFL football. But in 1970, a new weekly tradition that included one featured game on Monday night forever changed the landscape of the game. Few could imagine the enduring impact of ABC’s telecast of the NFL during prime time on a weeknight. Doubters were prevalent when the Cleveland Browns faced the New York Jets in the Monday Night Football debut on September 21, 1970. Yet the tradition became a nationwide phenomenon that captured huge ratings and in turn was a major reason for the NFL’s dramatic rise in popularity in the years that followed.

The judging criteria are: a) Does the design truly capture the moment?  b) Is the art of the highest possibility quality? and c) Is the concept so amazing that even visitors who don’t love football will still want to come see it?  Artists new to CAFÉ www.CallForEntry.org should reach out to Alaska Thompson, Project Coordinator at (330) 546-3098 or artbyalaska@gmail.com with questions.  Applying is a two-step process: 1) first you create a profile on CAFÉ https://youtu.be/2XOoFON-HMw , and 2) then you use your profile to apply for this specific call: Monday Night Football Design Competition ($7,500 in Prizes)

Dracula…the Ballet Returns to Haunt the Palace Stage

Canton Ballet will reprise its elegant and mesmerizing contemporary work Dracula…the Ballet in two evening performances on Friday, October 21, and Saturday, October 22, at the Canton Palace Theatre at 7:30 p.m.

Guest artist Damien Highfield of Groundworks Dance Theatre will perform the role of Dracula.  Canton Ballet’s artistic and executive director is Cassandra Crowley.

Choreographed in two acts by the ballet’s choreographer in residence Angelo Lemmo, Draculathe Ballet is based on novelist Bram Stoker’s classic gothic romance tale and stunningly retold in the medium of ballet.  Lemmo’s original music score is compiled from many genres—New Age, classical and choral, among others—with eerie sounds and special effects throughout.

Admission is $21-25 for adults and $15-17 for children under 18.  There is a discount for groups of 10 or more.  Reserved seat tickets may be purchased in advance online at www.cantonballet.com and in person or by telephone at 330-455-7220 at the ballet box office in the Canton Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Ave. N., between 9 am and 5 pm Monday through Thursday.

The beautifully restored historic Palace Theatre is located at 605 Market Ave. N. in the downtown Canton arts district.  There is a wheelchair seating area on the main floor.  The theatre box office opens one hour before performance time for advance purchase pickups and walkup sales only.

For additional information visit cantonballet.com or call the ballet office at 330-455-7220.  Canton Ballet receives operating funds from ArtsinStark, Ohio Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts with additional support from The Canton Repository, Kenan Advantage Group, Western Reserve Public Media, WHBC, WKSU, my 101.3 and Q92.

CSO Announces New Assistant Conductor

Canton Symphony Orchestra appoints

Matthew Jenkins Jaroszewicz as Assistant Conductor

http://artsinstarkblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/MJJ-Headshot-144x144.jpeg 144w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" />Matthew Jenkins Jaroszewicz has been named Assistant Conductor of the Canton Symphony Orchestra.  With this position, he becomes the Director of the Canton Youth Symphonies, and takes on the Canton Symphony Orchestra’s various educational concerts and pops series.

Matthew comes to the Canton Symphony Orchestra from New York City, NY, where he is conductor and Artistic Director of Apotheosis Opera.  Currently in its fourth season, Apotheosis Opera has scheduled Richard Strauss’ Capriccio for its summer opera experience.  Some of Matthew’s other conducting experiences in New York and New England include the Buffalo Philharmonic, Mannes Opera, and Wakefield Choral Society.  Other positions held by Matthew include accompanying The Charles River Chorale and Children’s Choir, and choir director and organist at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Holliston, MA.

Matthew earned his Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting from the Mannes College of Music in New York City, NY, and his Bachelor of Arts in Music from Brown University in Providence, RI.  His primary teachers include David Hayes, Vittorio Parisi, Johnathan Schiffman, and James Fellenbaum.

Under Mr. Jaroszewicz’s direction, the Canton Youth Symphonies will perform 3 concerts during the 2017-2018 season.  The Canton Youth Symphonies, now three orchestras strong, give young musicians of all ages the opportunity to rehearse and perform in a full orchestra.  Auditions for this year’s Canton Youth Symphonies will be held at the end of August, dates are still pending.    Students interested in auditioning should call Irene Barker, Director of Education and Community Engagement at 330-452-3434 ext. 604 to reserve an audition time.

Founded in 1937, the Canton Symphony Orchestra is a fully professional ensemble and organization dedicated to performing concerts that enrich, educate and entertain residents of Stark County and beyond. The orchestra performs classical, holiday, and a variety of educational programs in Umstattd Performing Arts Hall, 2323 17th Street NW, Canton, Ohio, as well as other venues in Stark County. For more information, please visit www.cantonsymphony.org or call (330)452-2094. Administrative offices are located at the Zimmermann Symphony Center, 2331 17th Street NW, Canton OH 44708.

Top American Artists Tackle the History of Football in New Exhibit

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present is the first comprehensive assembly of work by prominent American artists focusing on football. This exciting new exhibition is on view August 1 – October 29, 2017 with a special public reception on August 10 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Scrimmage will allow audiences from around the country to discover and explore football and art in a community steeped in both. This special exhibition is organized by the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art (formerly the University Art Museum) at Colorado State University, and the Jorden Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

Through works assembled from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the Figge Art Museum, Denver Art Museum, The Rockwell Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts – Houston, Yale University, Canton Museum of Art, and numerous other public and private collections, including paintings, prints, sculptures, and new media, Scrimmage details the history of football from the end of the Civil War to the present, exploring themes such as race, teamwork, and competition for viewers to examine today. Scrimmagefeatures 60 works from American artists including: Winslow Homer,Holiday in Camp, 1865; R. Tait McKenzie, The Onslaught, 1920; Thomas Hart Benton, Forward Pass, 1972; Andy Warhol, O.J. Simpson, 1977; and Ernie Barnes, Fumble in the Line, 1990.

Scrimmage Programming:
Along with the exhibit, several collaborative events are planned to bring Scrimmage to life over three months throughout the Canton community:

– Pro Football Hall of Fame (August 1 – 6) will connect Hall of Fame players to audiences with panel discussions of health issues, race in sports, and the linkage of football and art. Dates and times of the presentations will be announced as they are made available.

– Arts In Stark ‘The Eleven’ Art Project (August 4) will unveil the newest mural, Super Bowl III, by artist Dirk Rozich with a free public reception at the Cultural Center for the Arts.

– AULTCARE Family Field Day (September 9) will be a free event to engage in outdoor arts and sports activities, and explore theScrimmage exhibit through tours led by local high school football coaches at the Canton Museum of Art. 11AM-3PM

– Canton Ballet (August – October) will perform variations ofTouchdowns and Tutus, a program featuring high school football players paired with dancers to illustrate how players use ballet as a training technique, at various community events.

– Canton Symphony Orchestra (September 3) will present a Summer in the Park “Tailgating” concert reliving football in music from film and television in advance of NFL season kickoff.

– Massillon Museum (August – October) continues an exhibit series with its Paul Brown collection, celebrating Brown as the first coach of the Cleveland Browns and a leader in racial integration of football.

– Canton Palace Theatre (September 7 – 8) will present Football Film Days featuring time-honored football favorites from the movies.

– Stark District Library (August– October) will be working with the Museum to present programs based on the book “Rudy: My Story,” which was chosen for the Library’s One Book, One Community feature.

Scrimmage Origins
This exhibition developed as curators discovered that a host of prominent American artists had pictured aspects of football and the public culture surrounding the sport, yet no focused art historical study had examined these images; in fact, very little research has addressed the large body of artworks that engage with sports.

The exhibition is not meant to present a history of football – the development of rules and gradual changes in play, the history of teams or players – but instead offers a window to understanding themes central to American life, both past and current. As such, the exhibition explores these images from multiple perspectives and themes. The Canton Museum of Art invites visitors to engage in a dialogue – with works of important American artists as a springboard – about sports, art, and their roles in our history and culture, and to reflect on how these images reveal attitudes and transitions in American life. The exhibition is divided into eight sections:

Football: the Spectator Sport 
How did football, which began as a private extracurricular activity for a small group of young men, become the public spectacle we know today?  Early on the sport was embraced by college administrators who saw benefits, including the potential for financial gain – contributions from alumni and institutional giving loyalty – and increased interest from the press. This exhibition examines the public culture of football as spectator sport. Football soon developed a culture separate from play on the field – bands, cheerleaders, mascots, team colors, pep-rallies, homecoming, and parades –  were all introduced early in the history of the sport. These remain vital parts of the culture and have led to modern-day fan-driven activities like tail-gating, team merchandising, and extensive half-time extravaganzas brought to super-size scale at the Super Bowl.  Artists, as fascinated by these phenomena as the game itself, picture these American obsessions.

Class, Race and Ethnicity
Initially isolated to the campuses of the Ivy Leagues, football began as a sport for upper-class white Americans. The exhibition examines issues of class, race, and ethnicity and football’s transition from an Ivy League sport to a mass-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-racial phenomenon. How did this transition happen? Early and frequent press coverage brought football to a mass audience, broadening interest in the sport; at the turn of the century American immigrants began to engage in casual games as a means of assimilation into American life; and, as the American education system democratized, welcoming a wider-spectrum of students to campuses across the country, college football rosters began to reflect a more diverse population.  Despite this, the imagery of football reflects ongoing racial and ethnic prejudice and biases.  While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery.

Football, Struggle, War and the “Strenuous Life”
President Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “strenuous life,” urging American men and boys to develop strength through athletics in preparation for “the rough work of the world.” In a 1900 article entitled “The American Boy” Roosevelt singled out football as a model. He admonished the American boy to engage in “manly exercises and to develop his body” and concluded by writing: “In short, in life, as in a foot-ball game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”  For Roosevelt, the “strenuous life” was also preparation for the necessity of war and keeping America strong.  This exhibit examines artists’ depictions that relate to the promotion of football as a model for masculinity and that suggest analogies to warfare.

Gender in Football: Women’s Roles
Despite Title IX legislation and attempts at developing women’s football leagues, women have not played a role on the gridiron. Yet women figure prominently in football imagery. The exhibition explores how images both perpetuate and challenge gender stereotypes. While Charles Dana Gibson’s The Coming Game: Yale vs. Vassar, 1895, places women as protagonists on the field, the majority of artists portray women in passive and objectified roles.  As adorned spectators, cheerleaders, drum majorettes, women serve as foils that clearly define play on the field as a masculine realm.

Football and Violence
Current discussions about long-term football injuries and the concussion crisis suggest that these concerns are new. Yet, as early as the colonial period, rudimentary forms of football were outlawed and condemned for their violent nature and for provoking incendiary behavior. And, in the early part of the 20th century, despite his love for football, Theodore Roosevelt bemoaned the lawless nature of the game. The troublesome nature of football, explored by artists from the 19th century through the contemporary period, emerged first in a score of illustrations.  In Scrimmage artists picture the extreme physical nature of the sport and its ramifications.

The American Sport
Yale Coach, Walter Camp (1859-1925), widely known as the “father of American football,” envisioned a game that mirrored a model of capitalism, industrial strength, and American ingenuity. Creating rules that clearly distinguished football from what he saw as its unruly English antecedents, Camp’s football imitated an American corporate structure with each player fulfilling a specific assignment, a hierarchy of positions, and managerial roles for quarterback and coaching staff.  In the exhibition, artwork reflects these ideas and other traditions specific to American ways of life, including the association of the Thanksgiving holiday with football, the quarterback as American hero, and the sport as a rite-of-passage.

Celebrity Culture and the Media
The rise of football as an American sport is directly tied to media coverage. In Scrimmage, a number of prints are displayed that were published and widely distributed through a popular press that brought the sport to wide attention. Michael Oriard’s books, Reading Football, and King Football, trace the arc of media coverage from these early prints, through the rise of radio, newsreels, and movies, to the advent of the televised game, chronicling how our mediated world has promoted the sport and its participants. The first televised game took place on December 28, 1958 and gradually, television coverage accentuated spectacle; the use of slow motion, instant replay, half-time interviews and locker room footage, turned the football contest into high drama, and heightened attention to the celebrity status of individual players. Television also transformed the way that football was seen – allowing fans to follow teams from the comfort of their own homes. In this section we examine artists reacting to celebrity culture and to mediated views of football.

Athleticism
The concept of “muscular Christianity” promoted in the late 19th and early 20th century suggested that vigorous exercise and participation in sports competition, developed positive moral characteristics. Popularized, in great part, because of fears that an urbanized workforce lacked physical fitness, the movement promoted strenuous activity.  Football was often a model.  Though not always aligned to the movement of “muscular Christianity” American leadership has repeatedly emphasized the need for physical fitness, athletic achievement, teamwork and sportsmanship.  Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and John F. Kennedy all stressed the need for improved physical condition; Eisenhower established the President’s Council on Youth Fitness in 1956 and Kennedy urged better physical fitness in light of Cold War competition with a fit Soviet populace.  Today, Michelle Obama promotes “Let’s Move” as a means towards a healthier, less sedentary life.  In this section we examine artists who celebrate the athletic prowess of athletes and the skill and beauty of athletics.

This special exhibition has been made possible with support in part by Stark Community Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, ArtsInStark, Aultcare, Visit Canton, and the Key Bank Foundation.

Media Images
High-resolution images can be downloaded via the provided link below.

DOWNLOAD HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES VIA THIS LINK:

http://bit.ly/2thuK68

About the Canton Museum of Art
The Canton Museum of Art (CMA) is one of Ohio’s premier museums for an exceptional visual arts experience. CMA is recognized for powerful national touring exhibits; dynamic CMA-original exhibits; an unrivaled Permanent Collection of American watercolors and contemporary ceramics; and innovative education outreach programs, in-Museum classes, and workshops. CMA is one of only two Stark County museums accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.For more information, including hours, exhibits, classes, and special events, call 330.453.7666, visit www.cantonart.org, Facebook at “Canton Museum of Art,” or @CantonMuseum on Twitter.

Admission: Regular admission is $8 Adults; $6 Seniors and Students (with valid I.D.); Museum Members are Free; and Children 12 and under, Free. Tickets are available at the Museum Ticket Office during Museum hours. For group visits, discounts, and tours, please call 330.453.7666 at least two weeks prior to your visit for reservations and/or to request a docent-led tour.

Canton Museum of Art Hours:
Hours – Monday: Closed; Tues – Thurs: 10am – 8pm; Fri – Sat: 10am – 5pm; Sun: 1 – 5pm

Location: The Canton Museum of Art is located in the Cultural Center for the Arts, 1001 Market Avenue North, Canton, Ohio 44702. Free onsite parking is available around the Museum. Call 330.453.7666 for information and directions or visit our website at www.cantonart.org.

North Canton Playhouse Presents Disney’s Beauty and the Beast

The North Canton Playhouse presents Disney’s Beauty and the Beast” Musical

 

Directed by Debbie Cardy

Music by Alan Menken

Lyrics by Howard Ashman Tim Rice

Book by Linda Woolverton

Originally Directed by Robert Jess Roth

Originally Produced by Disney Theatrical Productions

Beauty and the Beast is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International 

 

Performance Dates: July 27 – August 13, 2017

Where: North Canton Playhouse Main Stage ( 525 7th St. N.E., North Canton)

Tickets:  General Admission $15

Story Time with Belle: Child Ticket $10, Accompanying Adult free

Tea Time with Mrs. Potts: Child Ticket $15, Adult Ticket $10

Performance dates, times, details and tickets can be found at www.northcantonplayhouse.com by clicking “Beauty and the Beast tickets”.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.northcantonplayhouse.com or by calling 330-494-1613 Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 9am-2pm.

 

Synopsis:

The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed into his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity.

 

Story Time with Belle:

Come and listen to a story told by your favorite princess, Belle, with the help from some of her friends. There will be a special copy of the Little Golden Book of the original “Beauty and the Beast” story signed by the entire cast given out to all the children along with a treat. The event will cost $10 per child (accompanying parents are at no additional charge but they must make a reservation). Reservations are in addition to the price of the show ticket.

 

Tea Time with Mrs. Potts:

Come and dine in our French provincial town and meet the characters from Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. They will be coming around to the tables to visit and you will be able to get their autograph in a special coloring/autograph book designed just for this occasion. This will be a special “reservation only” lunch that will include a light meal (sandwiches, fruit and cookies) and all the tea you would like. Mrs. Potts will be sharing a few thoughts with the children as well as a story where the enchanted objects solve a  mystery along with the help of the audience. The parent meal does not include the autograph/coloring book and other extra items for the children. Reservations are in addition to the price of the show ticket.